News internet dating scams

The joint report from the ACCC and the Australian Cybercrime Online Reporting Network shows 200,000 reports of scams last year, with losses totalling almost 0 million.

Ms Rickard said the two most common social media scams reported were dating, romance and fake trader scams.

Social media is emerging as the new hunting ground for scammers to find victims, according to new data out today.

The consumer watchdog's annual scam report also identifies a whopping 47 per cent increase in all reports it receives about scams.

(It is estimated that only 15 percent of fraud victims report their losses to law enforcement, so the real numbers are probably higher.) As one result, fear of a horrible first date is just one of the things a would-be online dater has to worry about. “Most people think the victims are middle-aged women who can't get a date, but I have worked with men and women of all ages—doctors and lawyers, CEOs of companies, people from the entertainment industry—who you’d never think in a million years would fall for these scams but do,” says Barb Sluppick, who runs romancescams.org, a watchdog site and online support group.

According to the Consumer Reports 2016 Online Dating Survey of more than 114,000 subscribers, among the respondents who were considering online dating but were hesitant, 46 percent said they were concerned about being scammed. “Typically the scammer builds trust by writing long letters over weeks or months and crafting a whole persona for their victims,” says Unit Chief David Farquhar from the Financial Crimes Section of the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) who specializes in cyber-related crimes.

If you’ve seen the classic movie Grease, you may know the tune “Summer lovin’, had me a blast.

Summer lovin’, happened so fast.” The love story of Danny and Sandy may have had its dramatic ups and downs, but in the end (spoiler alert! That wasn’t quite the case when one local woman thought she had met an eligible bachelor on a popular online dating app.It identifies a "sharp increase" in scams taking place through social media sites such as Facebook."It can be really hard to tell who's genuine and who's fake these days," Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) deputy chairwoman Delia Rickard said.He asked the Boise woman to wire him the money in his time of need. When she started to recognize red flags, she questioned the man of his intentions and identity.Soon after, she started getting texts from someone claiming to represent the Ohio Police Department stating they have verified the identity of the man she was talking to and confirmed he “is a good person and that it is OK to resume dating him.” That’s when she knew it was a ruse.Fake trader scams are increasing, where victims see advertisements for online stores on social media selling discounted products made by well-known brands.

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